POLITICS & INSTITUTIONS - ECONOMY

Cafés and restaurants can open this week



Common sense must prevail, said prime minister Xavier Bettel on Monday when he announced the imminent reopening of restaurants and cafés. Customers should wear masks when not seated at their table, and should try to “dine with the same people, where possible.” SIP/Jean-Christophe Verhaegen

Common sense must prevail, said prime minister Xavier Bettel on Monday when he announced the imminent reopening of restaurants and cafés. Customers should wear masks when not seated at their table, and should try to “dine with the same people, where possible.” SIP/Jean-Christophe Verhaegen

Tables will be limited to four guests--unless they come from the same household--and there will be no standing allowed in cafés. Also, the initial phase of reopening will not include late night licences--indeed, establishments will have to close at midnight. This is to prevent diners and drinkers from across the border being tempted to come to the grand duchy for a night out, said Bettel.

Tables must be placed at least 2 metres apart, though plexiglass separators can be used where this is not possible. Staff will be obliged to wear masks, and so will customers when not seated at their table. Tables will have to be reserved in advance so that establishments can manage customer flow.

“These are the measures we can allow right now,” said prime minister Xavier Bettel (DP). He said that the decision was taken based on modelling by researchers.

Bettel also said that cinemas, culture venues and places of worship, as well as fitness centres can open if strict social distancing is respected. That means that seats will have to be reserved in advance. But swimming pools and saunas will not yet be allowed to reopen and playgrounds, both indoor and outdoor, will also remain closed.