POLITICS & INSTITUTIONS - POLITICS

Corruption case

Justice minister told Dieschbourg of investigation



On 22 April Dieschbourg  announced her surprise resignation , saying she is leaving government to testify in a corruption case that forced Differdange mayor Roberto Traversini (déi Gréng) to resign in 2019. Photo: Romain Gamba / Maison Moderne

On 22 April Dieschbourg announced her surprise resignation , saying she is leaving government to testify in a corruption case that forced Differdange mayor Roberto Traversini (déi Gréng) to resign in 2019. Photo: Romain Gamba / Maison Moderne

Justice minister Sam Tanson informed Green party colleague and environment minister Carole Dieschbourg of an investigation against her before members of parliament found out.

Dieschbourg (déi Gréng) on 22 April announced her surprise resignation, saying she is leaving government to testify in a corruption case that forced Differdange mayor Roberto Traversini (déi Gréng) to resign in 2019.

Traversini had failed to request planning permission for building works on a garden shed, located within a so-called Natura 2000 protected area. Dieschbourg had been accused of favouritism as a special building permit was granted after works had already begun.

The public prosecutor’s office on 12 May confirmed to RTL that it had informed justice minister Sam Tanson (déi Gréng) of the investigation on 21 April, saying that this was normal in such a case to prevent the minister from finding out about an important file in the media.

The prosecutor also said that passing on this information was up to Tanson. 

This meant that Dieschbourg knew about the investigation before members of parliament as president Fernand Etgen (DP), who was also informed of the investigation on 21 April, decided to hold back the discussion with his colleagues until the next day.  

Prior to a meeting in parliament scheduled for 12pm, the public prosecutor’s office however published an official statement saying it had forwarded the case to the chamber, with Dieschbourg resigning during an 11am press conference.

Etgen declined to comment to RTL whether it was unfortunate timing that Dieschbourg had been in the know ahead of lawmakers.  

A discussion whether the Chamber of Deputies will lead the investigation is ongoing. A legal opinion initially said the chamber should deal with the case as it dates back to Dieschbourg’s time in office. Constitutional expert Luc Heuschling, however, had shed doubt on this opinion and said the matter could also go back to the public prosecutor’s office.