LIFESTYLE - EXPAT GUIDE

Expat Guide 2021-2022

Email sign offs in the local tongues



Mastering message sign-offs in the country’s three national languages can make a difference Shutterstock

Mastering message sign-offs in the country’s three national languages can make a difference Shutterstock

Just a few foreign words can make a difference: even if you don’t speak the country’s three official languages, finishing your email with a French, German or Luxembourgish greeting is a sign of friendliness and good faith.

Luxembourgish

In an email to a government official, you might want to sign off with “Mat beschte Gréiss” (with best regards), often abbreviated as “MbG” or “Bescht Gréiss”. Also formal would be “Mat engem schéine Bonjour” (with kind greetings--literally, “with a beautiful hello”). For a more familiar tone, try “Mat léiwe Gréiss” (with kind regards), which you can shorten to “Léif Gréiss”. Or: “E grousse Merci an all Guddes” (a big thank you and all the best).

French

For formal communications, you might want to end your email with “Sincères salutations” or “Salutations distinguées” (regards). For a less formal but still professional context, try “Cordialement” (sincerely) or “Bien à vous” (warm regards).

German

“Mit freundlichen Grüßen” (with friendly greetings) is a good one, which you might also find in contracted form: “MfG”. There is also “Mit besten Grüßen” (with kind regards).