POLITICS & INSTITUTIONS - EDUCATION

Cross-cutting approach

“Gender equality is learned at school”



"Luxembourg schools defend a model of society that does not discriminate against anyone on the basis of gender. A little girl can code as well as a boy", insists Claude Meisch, Minister for National Education, Children and Youth. (Photo: Mega)

"Luxembourg schools defend a model of society that does not discriminate against anyone on the basis of gender. A little girl can code as well as a boy", insists Claude Meisch, Minister for National Education, Children and Youth. (Photo: Mega)

On Monday 14 June, Taina Bofferding and Claude Meisch presented a plan to foster a culture of gender equality from the first years of school.

"Our laws ensure equality between the sexes, we must now ensure that equality is experienced and guaranteed for everyone in everyday life", explained Taina Bofferding (LSAP), Minister for Equality between Women and Men, at a joint press conference with Claude Meisch (DP), Minister for National Education, Children and Youth, on Monday 14 June.

The government wants to have a cross-cutting approach to raise awareness of gender equality among children and adolescents. "The aim is to prevent sexist behaviour and violence, to avoid discrimination and to know how to identify gender stereotypes", adds the press release from the Ministry of Equality between Women and Men.

"Making equality a reality

Materials such as the "Mega Katalog" with interactive workshops in the field, Pixi books and the "We are equal" brochure have been developed. Online videos also help the public to understand the impact of equality on personal development and ensuring an inclusive society. The ministry's thematic website rockmega.lu gathers information for parents, teachers, educators and “anyone interested in learning about equality and education. The aim is to stimulate discussion and reflection to make equality a reality.”

For its part, the Ministry of National Education, Children and Youth has drawn up guidelines for a balanced representation of the sexes in school textbooks. “Luxembourg’s school system defends a model of society that does not discriminate against anyone on the basis of their gender. A girl can code as well as a boy, a young man can look after young children as well as a young woman who can be a successful mechanic. These are the values we want to communicate to the students," insists Claude Meisch.