POLITICS & INSTITUTIONS - EUROPE

Master's programme

High-performance computing education headed by University of Luxembourg



To design the pilot master’s programme, a consortium of universities, supercomputer research centres and industrial and SME partners was selected by the EuroHPC Joint Undertaking, with the University of Luxembourg heading up this partnership. Photo: Nader Ghavami

To design the pilot master’s programme, a consortium of universities, supercomputer research centres and industrial and SME partners was selected by the EuroHPC Joint Undertaking, with the University of Luxembourg heading up this partnership. Photo: Nader Ghavami

A first pan-European High-performance computing (HPC) master’s programme will be established as of Autumn 2022, and the University of Luxembourg is at the helm of the project.

To design the pilot master’s programme, a consortium of universities, supercomputer research centres, industrial and SME partners was selected by the EuroHPC Joint Undertaking. This partnership, established in 2018 by the EU, aims to turn the Union into a leader in high-performance computing (HPC) by pooling the resources of its member states.

“The consortium members are proud and excited to have been chosen to develop this pilot Master’s programme. We will now work with great commitment and energy to implement our proposal that aims to offer first courses in September 2022, and provide added value to society and to students. It is a strategic investment that will support the development of a world-class HPC ecosystem in Europe,” said Pascal Bouvry, head of HPC infrastructure at the University of Luxembourg.

The partnership of European universities, research centres and companies will have €7m at its disposal to develop the higher education programme. It will be aimed towards those aspiring to integrate the HPC ecosystem as well as those already working in the field. Students will be educated in areas such as design, deployment and the use of current and future generation HPC. Meanwhile experts, already skilled in HPC, will receive training in different strategic domains, linking academia with HPC activities in business.

Many universities offer basic computer science and programming languages, but they do not meet the requirements of an education adapted to the rapidly growing HPC ecosystem. The EuroHPC project aims precisely to bridge that gap.

The consortium will look to develop one or more pilots of a European master’s of science programme for HPC. This is part of the EuroHPC Joint Undertaking’s broader strategy to support the development of key HPC skills and training for European science and industry.

In June this year, Luxembourg launched the Meluxina high-performance computer, a €30.4m investment marking the latest chapter in the country’s digitalisation strategy. The supercomputer forms part of a network of eight such computers across Europe, in Finland, Italy, Spain, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Slovenia and Portugal. The joint undertaking’s headquarters are located at the Luxembourg site.