POLITICS & INSTITUTIONS - INSTITUTIONS

The future of healthcare

LIH presents new book on precision health



From left to right: Claude Meisch, minister of national education, childhood, and youth talks with Ulf Nehrbass, chief executive officer of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (on the left) MENJE

From left to right: Claude Meisch, minister of national education, childhood, and youth talks with Ulf Nehrbass, chief executive officer of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (on the left) MENJE

The Luxembourg Institute of Health, in collaboration with Script, has developed a book on precision health. It provides an overview of current health, medicine, and research and covers how these disciplines will evolve in the future.

Luxembourg’s education minister Claude MeischClaude Meisch (DP) and CEO of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) Ulf NehrbassUlf Nehrbass presented the book, titled Precision Health, on 20 October. The book was written by LIH researchers and gives an overview of current health, medicine and research, including precision health and precision medicine. Several teams at the LIH currently conduct research in this domain.

The book was developed in collaboration with Script (Service de Coordination de la Recherche et de l’Innovation pédagogiques et technologiques), whose main mission is to promote initiatives and research aimed at pedagogical and technological innovation throughout the Luxembourgish education system, as well as quality assurance mechanisms in education.

What does the future of healthcare look like?

“The world around us is changing rapidly,” according to LIH CEO NehrbassNehrbass. “Technology is re-shaping the way we move about it, and it is transforming the fields of medicine and biomedical research.” Will robots treat patients in the future? How will artificial intelligence be used in healthcare? The new book takes readers to the year 2050 and explores the role that technology will play in connecting doctors and patients.

Precision Health, which will be distributed to students in training programmes related to health professions in December, is meant to encourage young people to innovate and to get involved in the domain of precision health. You can find out more and download a copy of the book here.

What is precision health?

Precision health, the book’s subject, is a way of developing personalised solutions to health issues by taking into account the differences in people’s genes, environments and lifestyles. Using data, it aims to deliver the best intervention to the right person at the right time.

The LIH’s department of precision health focuses on research across many domains, including digital health, sociodemographic inequalities, health economics and lifestyle and the roles these factors play in diseases like cancer or covid-19. They use new digital technologies and artificial intelligence to analyse data and help patients.

Their projects and clinical trials are diverse. Examples include digital therapeutic devices for children with autism, an assessment of the sustainability of the Luxembourgish food system, or a study on exposure to pollutants in young people with obesity.