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Covid-19 vaccine

Vaccines unlikely to affect pregnancy, says study



Pregnant women who received the vaccine are not endangering their unborn children, says US study.  Photo: Shutterstock

Pregnant women who received the vaccine are not endangering their unborn children, says US study.  Photo: Shutterstock

Following fears that covid-19 vaccines could cause infertility or negatively impact pregnancies, a study by the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published on 4 January showed that inoculation added no risks to a pregnancy.

Although 96% of the 10,064 vaccinated women in the study--over 40,000 participants--received their first shot during their second or third trimester, the timing of the vaccination had no impact on the pregnancy, the study suggests.

In addition, as reports Reuters, the rate of preterm births--under 37 weeks of gestation--were marginally lower (4.9%) than the rate for unvaccinated women (7.0%). Considering the difference in the sample groups--roughly 36,000 were not vaccinated at the time of the birth--and the small difference, the discrepancy was considered statistically insignificant.

Although some women have reported heavier or more painful periods following the vaccine--an inflammatory or stress-induced response of the body, said Luxembourg  gynaecologist Marc Pfeiffer previously--the impact on fertility and the unborn child’s health has so far not been proven.

Instead, as the CDC and the Higher Council for Infectious Diseases point out, unvaccinated women, though not more likely to be infected, have higher risks of developing symptoms and landing in intensive care. This could lead to increased risks for the child and mother, says the CDC.