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Better mobility

Small gestures for more safety



Not only automobilists, but also cyclists and pedestrians are targeted by the road safety campaign launched by the ministry of mobility and the Sécurité routière.  Photo: Shutterstock

Not only automobilists, but also cyclists and pedestrians are targeted by the road safety campaign launched by the ministry of mobility and the Sécurité routière.  Photo: Shutterstock

The minister of mobility François Bausch (déi Gréng)  and Paul Hammelmann, president of the non-profit Securité Routière, presented on 25 November a joined campaign aiming to raise awareness around safety on the road. The campaign launches on 26 November.

“It is imperative to look out for other road users and to adopt the right gestures at all times. Let's all try to save lives together,” said Bausch at the conference. The campaign, through a variety of TV and radio spots, as well as advertisements in the trams and buses, hopes to invite anyone on the road, meaning car drivers, motorcyclists, cyclists, and pedestrians, to pay more attention while navigating in public areas.

Despite a decrease of traffic-related deaths and grave injuries over the last ten years (-8%), the overall number of incidents had increased by 24% between 2010 and 2020 and 1,4% from 2019 to 2020. The number of motorcyclists and cyclists who died following an incident also went up over the last year, despite an improvement over the ten-year period.

The main culprits cited for deadly and grave incidents are speed and alcohol, though there has been an improvement in numbers for the latter since 2013. However, a new frequent cause has been identified: inattentiveness.

Indeed, with 2,950 warnings handed to drivers who have used phones or other apparels while driving, carelessness at the wheel has caused 164 grave or deadly incidents.

The campaign thus invites all to not just circulate carefully, but also signal correctly when driving and to evaluate situations properly. One of the examples in the TV spots is a pedestrian who crosses the road while watching their phone screen--the driver would have paid more attention and thus slowed down and braked to let the pedestrian pass.

Hammelmann, from the road safety group, during the press conference, reminded that “no gesture is small if many do it,” a reference to a French campaign with a similar goal.