POLITICS & INSTITUTIONS - INSTITUTIONS

Constitution

Supreme justice council takes shape



The supreme justice council will monitor the justice system and ensure its independence Library photo: Romain Gamba / Maison Moderne

The supreme justice council will monitor the justice system and ensure its independence Library photo: Romain Gamba / Maison Moderne

A supreme justice council that will ensure the independence of the judiciary is taking shape as part of a reform of Luxembourg’s constitution.

The council will not be a supreme court but function as a watchdog to oversee the justice system and ensure the separation of powers.

A draft law was first tabled in 2018, but in 2020, the project was moved into the reform of the constitution, which broadly tackles the separation of powers, the role of the grand duke, the justice system, rights of children and animal rights, and academic freedom, among other topics.

The council will be composed of six judges, including the president or another judge of the supreme court, the state prosecutor or another judge of the public prosecutor’s office, the president of the administrative court or another judge of that court.

In addition, one lawyer will sit on the council as well as two people nominated by parliament based on their skills and expertise in the field but who are not directly affiliated with the courts.

Once the council is formally established, it will take around six months to appoint its members, representatives of the judiciary said during a meeting in parliament this week.